Alternative careers in science, Part 2

In a previous post, I talked about academia not being designed for people who have depression, anxiety, etc to succeed.  I also spent some time talking about imposter syndrome. This particular post is the second in a series about careers other than being a research advisor (PI) or even being a researcher in industry. Part 2 in a 3 part series.

Alternative careers in science, Part 1

In a previous post, I talked about academia not being designed for people who have depression, anxiety, etc to succeed.  I also spent some time talking about imposter syndrome. This particular post is the first in a series about careers other than being a research advisor (PI) or even being a researcher in industry. Part 1 in a 3 part series.

Not being the “perfect” scientist

I was talking to my advisor that day about these vague plans of mine, and he said something along the lines of “Don’t discount doing research.  There aren’t enough researchers who think about science like you do.  Think about becoming a PI.”   I did think about that, and it became my new plan.  But did I really understand what being a PI meant?

Communication with the non-scientific community

When I was in film school, I remember one class being asked “Why do we make films?” and hearing many different responses. “But what about the audience?” my film professor asked.  Many of the students in the class were baffled.  They had never thought about important it was to effectively communicate their vision to the audience.

The erasure of race in genetics

“Race doesn’t exist.” I remember the first time I heard this.  I was in my evolution class in undergrad.  My professor pulled up a picture of two subspecies of bird.  They looked exactly alike, and my professor mentioned that there is less genetic diversity between humans than between these two identical looking subspecies of bird.  Then he said it.  Race doesn’t exist. My partner happened to be taking the class with me.  She might have been…